How and Why LinkedIn Learned to Love Patents

How and Why LinkedIn Learned to Love Patents

Erik Oliver and Kent Richardson join LinkedIn's Sara Harrington, Vice President Legal IP, Product, Privacy, and Pierre Keeley, Director of Patents, to author the story of how LinkedIn connected its business needs with its patent strategy and fundamentally increased LinkedIn's freedom to operate. Over four years, LinkedIn built and bought more than 1,900 patents.

2016 Secondary Patent Market Report Available for Download

2016 Secondary Patent Market Report Available for Download

Our annual brokered market report is now available for download. We look at the average asking price for patents, who are the biggest buyers and sellers, which brokers are most active, and what happens after the patents are bought.

Patent Purchases and Litigation Outcomes

Patent Purchases and Litigation Outcomes

What's your chance of winning patent litigation with a patent you bought? In their Patently-O Patent Law Journal article, Professor Mark Lemley teams up with the Richardson Oliver Law Group to provide guidance.

When do Operating Companies Sell their Patents?

What causes operating companies to sell their patents? Our intuition tells us that patent sales take place when the seller is in financial distress or the company is underperforming. We asked ourselves whether data aligned with our intuition.

We looked at transaction data for sales from corporations. We studied the financial condition of 20 companies across 41 transactions over the last 6 years (post 2008 financial crisis) and looked for correlations between a company’s financial health and the sale of patents. We used sales from corporations to NPEs as a proxy for all corporate patent sales. In the analysis, we found that 78% of large patent sales (>= 10 patents transferred) occurred when the companies were underperforming the QQQ ETF (an exchange-traded fund based on the Nasdaq-100 Index, which was used as a proxy for the market). Further, including the smaller transactions (4-9 patents transferred), the overall share of transactions that occurred when the companies were underperforming the QQQ ETF was 71%.

Read the rest of the article at IPWatchdog.

Comparative Patent Ranking Approaches Around the World -- Citations Matter

Over the past 18 months, our clients have begun to show greater interest in international patents (e.g. non-US). Increasing client interest in international patents corresponds with the general rise in importance of international patents (continuing ascension of the Chinese market, potential for unitary patent for Europe), more anti-patent owner decisions in the US, and greater patent litigation outside the US. Client interest spurred us to review our existing patent evaluation tools and methodologies for potential improvements. We found that our current ranking system can be used for EP patents, especially with further calibration using EP data sets, and also that an integrated ranking approach that allows comparison and ranking of EP and US patents relative to one another is possible.

Read the full article at IPWatchdog and about the surprising importance of citation analysis in ranking systems.